George Nelson: A Retrospective

George Nelson Exhibition at Power House Museum, Sydney, 2013

“Design is an integral part of the business.” These are the words of George Nelson, one of the most important American designers of the 20th century. Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum is hosting an exhibition of his works, not only as an architect, but also as a graphic artist, product designer and much more, giving glimpse of his interesting career.

A model of American National Exhibition Pavilion

In some of our past blogs, we have discussed the variety of career paths some architects have chosen. George Nelson seems to be the one who has done almost everything an architect can do at the time. After earning an architectural degree, he worked as an author and journalist.

A model for the American Exhibition 'jungle gym'

In 1947 he opened his own design office when Herman Miller commissioned him to design their collection of furniture. He then ventured into business communications and corporate design of the company. His practice worked in the field of architecture, interiors, graphics, exhibitions and products.

Model of Experimental House

Walking through the exhibits makes one realise the creativity and versatility of Nelson. From miniature models of furniture to dozens of unique clock designs, the display is well curated to experience the complexity of his works.

George Nelson Exhibition at Power House Museum, Sydney, 2013

So if you are in Sydney anytime until 10 Jan 2014, do visit the exhibition.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

Archikidz! hits Sydney in October

“Building great environments is all about learning to see the potentials of the world around us. Archikidz! is all about beginning to realise these potentials by inspiring kids to see the world as positive and full of possibilities.” These lines of Anthony Burke, Head of School Architecture, UTS (University of Technology, Sydney) capture the real essence of Archikidz!.

A decade ago, Archikidz! was initiated in Netherlands as an annual architectural workshop for children. The event is now held in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Bergen, Barcelona, Buenos Aries and, since last year, in Sydney. This year on Saturday 5 October, around 300 children between age 7-12 will gather at Carriageworks and will be introduced to the world of built environment. Working by side of architect volunteers, the kids will build their models, small and big, around the theme – Building Bridges.

The event is a community initiative of Arque, with the City of Sydney and the Australian Institute of Architects as major partners and is entirely run by volunteers and supporters. From our past experience of being part of the organising team, we know that a lot goes behind making this event. Seeing those amazing large and small scale models made on site by kids, giving a sense of achievement, is a moment all volunteers, sponsors and supporters cherish forever. If you are passionate about architecture and would like to get involved, visit the Archikidz! website to find out more.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

3 x 3 x 3 Design Challenge

As part of Sydney Design 2013, Powerhouse Museum in Sydney hosted the 3 x 3 x 3 Design Challenge where three teams of designers solved pressing problems in Sydney society – 1. Health, 2. Safety and 3. Community. Their solutions are being displayed in a 3 x 3 x 3 meter cube at the museum until 1st September 2013.

Health: Housing – By Paul Pholeros and Heleana Genaus and UNSW students

The housing element highlights the connection between health problems and parts of the living environment. Both in written charts and pictorial artworks, the display aims to spread the message of healthy living conditions and various precautions for some of the most common health issues.

Safety: Emergency shelter – By Jun Sakaguchi and Jeremy Bishop

This safety shelter was originally designed for the Emergency shelter exhibition in 2013. Made from materials that can easily be found after a brushfire disaster, the elements are designed with care to give comfort and lessen the trauma of disaster.

Community: Transportable work-shed – By Tasman Munro

The pop-up workshop cart ‘Wildebeest Workshop’ can be used for variety of community-based building projects, as a shed or for education programs. Made from recycled materials, the cart is small enough for transport and large enough to contain all the equipments needed for the workshops. This smart design can create and nurture various possibilities within a community in a very sustainable and economical way.

It is interesting to see how each team has responded differently to their chosen issue. One by building actual shelter, the other by creating the display to increase awareness and the third by designing mobile solution. Yet, they were spot-on in utilising the 3 x 3 x 3 space to display the solution for the chosen problem.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

Crafting a portrait of Sydney

Sydney, the largest city of Australia by population, is a diverse mix of culture, architecture, food, ethnicity, sport and everything else. To make a portrait of such a multifaceted city is a real challenge by twin sisters, Leanne and Naomi Shedlezki have seen this as an opportunity and turned it into a collaborative art project ‘People Make Places: Sydney’.

All Sydney-siders are invited to create a piece that fits within a matchbox and responds to the theme ‘Sydney – My City’. The interpretation is open to one’s imagination. All the matchboxes are being collected and stored into large transparent boxes forming the artwork and the result is a unique portrait of the City of Sydney.

The intention for it is to travel to many places in the world introducing Sydney through the eyes of the locals, telling stories of urban life by its residents, portraying the character of today’s multi-cultural society. Click here to get involved.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

RMIT Design Hub – A Creative Shell

Melbourne has always been a city that promotes unusual, innovative architecture and design. And if you have been wandering on Swanston and Flinders Street here, you will understand why we are saying this. Federation square, Council House 2, RMIT Green Brain (The Storey Hall) are just a few examples. Last year yet another building – RMIT Design Hub – joined this list of atypical architecture. Located at the corner of Swanston and Victoria Street, this building has a skin made up of approximately 16,250 glass discs spanning across all 9 levels of the building. In broad daylight, the white discs seem to disappear in the sky at a distance, creating a character of unending structure.

The 60cm diameter sandblasted glass discs are fixed to galvanised steel cylinders. These units of disc and cylinder are organised into panels, each panel comprising of 21 units from which 12 are operable allowing for perimeter air intake contributing to the passive cooling system for the structure and lowering the overall energy consumption. The architect Sean Godsell has found a perfect balance between aesthetic and sustainability in the building facade.

Earlier in our article, Q&A(rchitect), we discussed the diverse nature of an architecture practice. RMIT design hub seconds this speculation by providing a ‘warehouse’ style space  for various design disciplines under one roof. Students from diverse range of design research and post graduation studies can work alongside each other, modify spaces to suit the team requirements and achieve something unusual from creative collaborations. Thus, the large uniform off-white box of 13,000 sq m seems limitless from outside and has limitless design possibilities within.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens

Vivid installations by architectural professionals

Guest Contributors – Vin and Priyanka Rathod

In our earlier post ‘The facade as a canvas of light‘, we talked about the relationship between art and architecture where artists created light-art projections on some of the prominent facades along Sydney harbour. Vivid Sydney also hosted some innovative and interactive small scale light installations fascinating the visitors. Without doubt, some of them were conceptualised, developed and installed by professionals from architecture industry. Below are some we found very captivating.

Rats

Designed by the team at Hassell – Jason Hammond, Sarah Meyer and Bridget Tregonning – the installation Rats was based on the story of an infestation of rats arriving on ships from Europe in early 1900. The Walsh Bay Wharfs, where the installation is located, was renewed to include a pre-cast concrete seawall to stop the rats. It was very intriguing to see the rows of lights (eyes) in one corner of the bay, staring at you.

Possible Imprints

Nikola Kovac and Nicholas Malyon along with David Vu designed this dynamic interactive installation where visitors can push the luminous acrylic rods to create (and leave) an imprint. It was quite playful and attractive for people from all age groups.

Planet: Under Construction

The team at Woods Bagot – William Fernandez, Young Lee, Thomas Hale, Amanda Gore, India Collins, Sophia Bennet, Danny Wehbe, Penny Craswell – designed this globe-like sculpture from orange construction cones that symbolises planet. With its bright colour and strategic location, it was an attractive piece of artwork.

Euphonious Mobius

Rebekah Araullo’s sculptural freeform is an experiment to explore the visual and interactive potential of architecture and media using rich data displays cutting-edge design and application resulting in a 3D space.

Field of Colours

Nicholas Elias and Clinton Weaver had a site right under Harbour bridge and opposite to Opera House. Their take for the installation created a landscape of light and colour that reciprocated to view from all angles. With its soft presence, it created a surreal world for the passer-by.

Digitalis

Rana Abboud with Ewen Wright conceptualised the installation as a genetically modified breed of Digitalis Purpurea, a toxic plant that defends itself from threats by rattling. The cleverly used crumpled plastic cups rattled and LEDs brightened to warn off the intruder that approached too close to the installation.

Polka Kucha

Josh Henderson, Kat Jurkiewicz, Donn Salisbury, Ryan Shamier and Catriona Simmons from Grimshaw and Electrolight designed this simple installation based on the power of colour to influence mood, energy and spacial perception. The colours and form changed when a visitor turns a wheel to experience his own personal preference.

Bees

Designed by Jon Voss, a light-art representation of a bee-hive, the installation was inspired by the juxtaposition of apparent chaos and strict order.

Vivid Sydney is an annual event that brightens up the dark winter evenings of the City of Sydney. Expressions of interest are called for every year and a selection is made by an expert panel. For those who have inspiring ideas, look out for the call of expression of interest for next year’s event on Vivid Sydney website.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens

The facade as a canvas of light

Guest Contributors – Vin and Priyanka Rathod

There are many ways architecture interacts with the community and facilitates cultural behaviour. However, very few times it can actually become a canvas for an artwork. Vivid Sydney Festival has seen this opportunity and have converted the facades of some significant buildings along the harbour into canvases for light projections.

Every evening until 10th June, these building facades convert to canvases for vibrant colour light-art, and, in spite of cold and wet winter nights, Sydney-siders are enjoying every bit of the festival.

The projection at the Sydney Opera House, ‘Play’ is designed by Spinifex Group. It really is very playful giving vibrant colours to Opera sails.

The facade of Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) hosts 3D-mapped projections with a creative splurge of colours. The artwork is brought to life by collaboration of Gemma Smith, represented in MCA’s collection and Spinifex Group.

The heritage facade of Customs House has a striking projection ‘Move Your Building’ by collaboration of French design company, Danny Rose, Technical Direction Company, Customs House and the City of Sydney.

Spinifex Group in collaboration with Audi, transformed the facade of the Australasian Steam Navigation Company building into colourful 2D and 3D display that draws you in through the clever use of facade elements. The installation is creative, technical and energetic.

The Cadman’s Cottage allows people to render the projection using a large touch screen in front of the building. Designed by The Electric Canvas, it allows people to choose various regions on the facade and apply textures and animations in real time.

No doubt the Sydney Opera House is a highlight among all the facades, partly because of its unique form and also due to its location at the tip of the harbour. But Spinifex Group’s ‘Play’ has cleverly used the form to splash colourful projection that surely entertains every visitor. It makes one wonder about refreshing possibilities that can arise from creative collaboration between an architect and an artist.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens

Q&A(rchitect): A discussion on how emerging architects see the future of our profession

Guest Contributor: Priyanka Rathod

The profession of architecture is as versatile as that of an artist. In fact, an architect is an artist of the built environment. This was quite clear throughout all of the presentations and discussions at Q&A(rchitect) arranged by Darch last month. On the evening of 23 April, Tuesday, 5 young practices in Sydney presented the ideas, projects and hopes for the future of their practices, and none of them were similar to each other.

Penny Fuller of Silvester Fuller was awarded NSW Institute of Architects Emerging Architect Prize last year. The practice has produced a range of simple yet elegant projects. What I found most interesting is their vision for the future to be more proactive, i.e. to find a solution to built environment issues and then find a client to make the project happen. She believes as architects we are designers, but at the same time, we are entrepreneurs too.

Joe Snell of Snell Architects is also a creative director for the Goods Tube, the product he designed himself for gifting his corporate clients. His recent venture includes being a judge for TV show House Rules soon to telecast on Channel 7. He strongly believes that as architects, we shape not only spaces but also business, culture and the future.

Claire McCaughan and Lucy Humphrey established Archrival in 2011, a non-profit organisation that unites the creative community through unsolicited projects. Archrival creates various projects to unite creative professionals with community, technology and business industries which in turn explore the possibilities of collaboration and innovation. Their most recent project is an installation ‘Mirror Mirror’ at Australian Technology Park in Redfern. It is a stage for Vanishing Elephants for their showcase during MB Fashion Week Australia.

Amelia Holliday of Neesan Murcutt Architects presented her research and explored a very interesting idea – a practice of doing nothing. Sometimes doing nothing can also be a solution for built environment and as architects we need to recognise the right solution for our neighborhood.

Felicity Stewart and Matthias Hollenstein of Stewart Hollenstein, recent winner for Green Square Library Plaza, have been exploring the idea of developing natural spaces for interactions and performances in the public realm from their university years. Now, they will be able to transform their ideas into practice with the plaza that they have planned for construction in 2017. Our previous blog ‘Green Square Library Plaza won by Stewart Hollenstein and Collin Stewart Architects‘ explores their competition design in detail.

From the past and present projects and ideas of future from all these practices, it was quite clear that today, young architects cannot be satisfied in simply designing buildings. They want to, as always, explore and contribute to various creative fields and we’ll be seeing architects in many different roles exploring, innovating, resolving, engaging, entertaining and contributing to the community.

Green Square Library Plaza won by Stewart Hollenstein and Colin Stewart Architects

Guest Contributor: Priyanka Rathod

From 167 entires that included Australian as well as international architects, a young firm Stewart Hollenstein in association with Colin Stewart Architects won the competition organised by City of Sydney. From the judges’ comments during the design excellence award ceremony on 4 March 2013, it was very clear that the decision was unanimous, a well deserved victory for the duo Felicity Stewart and Matthias Hollenstein. They will work with City of Sydney to develop the design and plan for construction in 2017.

Green Square, just 4km south of Sydney CBD, is a suburb currently under transformation from predominantly light industrial to residential. As Lord Mayor Clover Moore mentioned during presentation, it is very important to create a social hub for the community envisaged in future. With recent success of Surry Hills Library, City of Sydney council is looking for a design where people want to come again and again, relax, play, interact, exchange ideas and learn.

Stewart Hollenstein’s design provided all of above, and most of all, it responded to the context very well. Remaining above the flood level line (there is a risk of flood once in 100 years), they managed to create a plaza with submerged functional spaces and just a few tall buildings. With a site surrounded by high density tall residential towers, this seemed a natural and most appropriate option.

The shape of the plaza is essentially derived from site constraints and the library is seen as a large submerged room surrounding a courtyard. The presence of an amphitheatre made it even more interesting. It is not just a place where one would have to go, but a place where one would want to go.

For me, the series of diagrams that explained the usability of the plaza during various events and various time of the day was really impressive. It was clear to me by the end of presentation from Felicity and Matthias that it is truly a well thought design and a deserving winner.

Images Courtesy: Stewart Hollenstein and City of Sydney

Architectural spaces in art

Guest Contributors – Vin and Priyanka Rathod

There are many different types of Aboriginal artworks. But not many have inspired us to see them as ‘architectural spaces’ as much as the collection of ‘Living Water’ at National Gallery of Victoria (NGV).

“Aboriginal people from across the Western Desert use the term ‘living water’ to describe water sources, including rock holes and soakage waters that are fed by underground springs. The path of these springs was created by the ancestral beings of the tjukurrpa (dreaming) as they themselves journeyed underground, their entry into the earth often marking the site of current day water sources. ‘Living water’ is revered also because it does not seem to be affected by the harsh conditions above the ground that the people themselves have to endure.”

The above excerpt from the exhibit description mentions about underground spaces being inspiration for these painting and it was very evident in each artwork. The patterns of lines, circles and curves all give a spacial character transferable to an actual built form. Some suggested an area diagram, while others a 2-dimensional drawing. At some point, we started looking at the paintings as plan or section of a space and that made the viewing even more interesting. It was like going on a special studio of basic design to draw inspiration from objects around you.

Living Water‘ is on display until 3 Feb 2013 at NGV. They also have a paperback publication Living Water: Contemporary Art of the Far Western Desert on their shelf for those who would like to keep the inspirational memories with them forever.

Below are some photographs of the artwork that inspired us the most.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens