Water tower sculptures arrive at Madison Square Park

Images courtesy Thelma Garcia

Three water tower sculptures, designed by the Brooklyn-based Chilean artist Ivan Navarro have been installed in New York’s Madison Square Park.  Measuring seven feet in diameter and standing on eight-foot-high supports, visitors can walk beneath the towers and look inside to see neon reflections that repeat infinitely.     Titled “This Land is Your Land” after a Woody Guthrie song, they allude to the freedoms offered in this country to its growing immigrant population.  The interior of one tower features the word “me” and “we”, another features the word “bed” and a third will display the image of a ladder all of which is composed of neon light.  An internal arrangement of mirrors will enable each word or image to repeat perpetually through a seemingly endless vertical space.   The exhibition, courtesy the Madison Square Park, is on view from February 20 – April 13, 2014.

Designed by SOM, Mumbai’s largest international airport terminal is now ready to open

Mumbai is all set to get its new, large and opulent international terminal which will be inaugurated next week on Friday by India’s prime minister, Manmohan Singh.  GVK, India’s leading conglomerate that runs Mumbai International Airport, took on the consortium project to build a new terminal to expand the congested and poorly functioning facility in 2007.

After six years it is ready to open one of the largest terminals in the world, beating Singapore’s Changi and the UK’s Heathrow in size, with its capacity to handle 40 million passengers each year. The airport is designed by New York’s Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM).  GVK’s managing director Gunupati Venkata Krishna Reddy wanted something Indian which could handle double the capacity efficiently and seamlessly.

Image copyright: SOM

The design of the terminal uses the Indian bird, the peacock, as a motif while the roof gives the impression of white peacocks in the sky. The 60-foot-high walls enclose a huge museum, housing 6,000-7,000 artefacts. The four-level airport building aims to be one of the most state-of-the-art facilities in the country. With 226,000 sq ft of retail space, it will offer everything that most international airports in the world boast of.

Spread over 4.4 million sq ft, terminal 2 will offer everything that represents modern and global standards at large facilities. Glass curtain walls and multi-level light wells provide ample natural light, while high-performance glazing and double glazing where necessary to cancel noise and rooftop greenery will help reduce solar heat gain. The terminal is cross-shaped to facilitate the quick and organised movement of both planes and passengers.

Come and visit Mumbai, all you world travellers, a swanky airport will welcome you!

Project Information

Project Completion Year: 2014

Design Completion Year: 2010

Project Inception Year: 2007

Site Area: 105 hectares

Project Area: 450,000 sq m

Number of storeys: 4

Building height: 45m

 

Institute of Urban Designers, India to launch Mumbai Chapter

The Mumbai Chapter of the Institute of Urban Designers, India (IUDI) has brought together an inclusive group of multi-disciplinary professionals ranging from planners, architects and policy makers and more with a mission to improve the quality of life and the image of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region through good Urban Design by sensitively working with existing urban neighborhoods, new sustainable developments, and the creation of better public places and humane built environment.

The Institute of Urban Designers, India (IUDI) was launched on 15th March 2008, with headquarters in New Delhi and IUDI has five Chapters so far. IUDI Mumbai will be launched as a Chapter in February 2014.

To address Mumbai’s diverse and rapid development challenges, the IUDI Mumbai Chapter sets itself the following goals and objectives as part of a Four-Point Agenda:

  1. Promote and Advocate Good Urban Design for the City and the Region
  2. Engage with, include, educate and learn from all stakeholders in the urban development process
  3. Promote Urban Design Education and Support Fraternity
  4. Be a Resource of Information on Urban Issues

Such an initiative is not only timely but has been one of the most crucial step which Mumbai as a City has completely missed out in the past which has become quite evident in the way Mumbai’s built environment is shaping up. At best, it feels fragmented, dysfunctional and lacking some of the most vital issues like livability, affordable housing, public spaces & amenities and public transportation. And thus keeping in mind the challenges faced by the City, IUDI aims to engage with people at different levels- academia, policy makers, local governance and professionals.

The IUDI Mumbai Charter will help impart an important gap in the development of Mumbai and the region. Several national policies emphasize the need for cities to plan ahead – primarily from the perspective of assessing future infrastructure demands.

Best practices of Urban Design can recuperate the quality of life for Mumbai’s people. The IUDI Mumbai Charter provides the foundation to start achieving that goal through the principles of good urban design.

Eventually it is the public life of the citizens of Mumbai and its region that will better. It will attempt to give the city a make-over as its reality and image develop towards becoming a city that is more responsible, more affordable and more accessible.

The IUDI is having its General Body Meeting on 11 December 2013 at 4pm at Rizvi College of Architecture, Bandra (W), Mumbai.

The Center is gearing up to launch itself as the ‘Mumbai Chapter of IUDI’ during its GBM and for membership enquiries one can write to: iudimumbai@gmail.com

For more information visit: www.udesindia.org

Campbell Sports Center named Best Building in NY

 

Campbell Sports Center courtesy Steven Holl Architects

The Municipal Arts Society has named the winners of its 2013 MASterworks Awards.  The Best Building honor went to Steven Holl Architects’ Campbell Sports Center at Columbia University.   Also honored was Weiss/Manfredi’s Brooklyn Botanic Garden Visitor Center in Brooklyn, which scooped the Best Urban Amenity Award; Rogers Marvel’s McCarren Pool and Bathhouse, which took The Best Renovation prize; and SHoP Architects’ Barclay’s Center, which won the Best Neighborhood Catalyst Award.

The awards, which recognize innovation in architecture and urban design, was judged by a panel comprised of Pedro Gadanho (Curator of Contemporary Architecture, Department of Architecture and Design at MoMA), Gabriel Calatrava (Principal, Calatrava), Toni Griffin (Professor of Architecture and Director, J. Max Bond Center, Spitzer School of Architecture, City College of New York, CUNY), and Mimi Hoang (Partner, nArchitects).

Said Municipal Art Society president, Vin Cipolla, “From an environmentally sustainable visitors center in Brooklyn to a state-of-the-art athletics facility in Upper Manhattan, the 2013 MASterworks winners are design assets to our city that contribute greatly to the urban landscape. MAS congratulates all of the winning design teams for their visionary ideas and commitment excellence, and we thank them for enhancing New York City, one building at a time.”

The 2013 MASterworks Awards will be presented later this week in a private ceremony held at the WTC sponsored by Silverstein Properties.

 

 

The BIM revolution must begin with manufacturers

Tony Ryan: Divisional Building Technology Manager at Kingspan Insulated Panels

Everywhere you look, people are talking about BIM. In fact, it’s fair to say that awareness of BIM and its forthcoming impact on the construction industry is very high. That’s hardly surprising; when the UK government announced the use of BIM would be mandatory for all public sector projects from 2016, it created a powerful incentive for AEC professionals working in the UK to get educated on BIM, and fast. But it does raise the question; how do we get from high awareness to high adoption of BIM, and whose responsibility is it to drive this change?

At face value, BIM is everybody’s responsibility. Fundamentally a collaborative way of working, it allows architects, specifiers, contractors, owners, occupiers and even demolition companies to share vital information throughout the entire lifecycle of a building much more efficiently than in the past. In that case, you might suggest that it is the responsibility of all of these groups to drive increased adoption of BIM.

That’s true, to a point. But while each of these groups have reasons to use BIM, from saving money to ensuring health and safety, increasing energy efficiency to reducing installation times, none of them have the power to drive it through from the start of the process. Architects can clamour for BIM-friendly products, and occupiers can request comprehensive ‘user guides’ to their buildings, but neither group can ensure that the files contain the level of information needed to make it work most effectively. They create the demand, but who creates the supply? That responsibility lies with manufacturers.

Here at Kingspan Insulated Panels, we’ve taken that responsibility to heart. We believe that it is up to manufacturers to take the BIM-friendly leap, and make the necessary investment to support their customers. Our work with the UK government part-funded 4BIM project, exploring BIM’s role across the supply chain, has highlighted the important part manufacturers must play to support the development of BIM use in building design, planning, construction, occupation and even end of life decommissioning.

Manufacturer-created BIM files (like the ones we’ve just released for some of our most popular products) save time, reduce the risk of incorrect data and help reduce clashes or errors in the design and installation phases. When the files are created and used in conjunction with support from the relevant manufacturers’ technical services departments, it’s possible to create a one-stop shop for architects, designers, contractors and end users.

We recognise that it’s still early days. There are a number of competing software providers, not all of which are compatible with one another, and nobody wants to invest in the BIM equivalent of Betamax, an expensive lesson in obsolescence. But the only way to drive adoption forward, and ensure that more collaborative software systems are developed and used, is to help BIM to reach critical mass.

From our perspective, that means releasing BIM files for all our core products in all the major software formats; Autodesk Revit, Nemetschek Vectorworks, Bentley AECOsim, Graphisoft ArchiCAD and IFC. And although the upfront cost of becoming BIM friendly may be a barrier now, it will become a necessary business investment as more architects embrace the technology and expect comprehensive offerings from all suppliers. Leave out BIM, and the chances are you’ll be left behind.

With our industry on the verge of such a fundamental change, there’s an opportunity for manufacturers, architects and specifiers to work together to determine better ways of working to make the most of BIM. That’s why, with one eye on the future, we’re exploring ways to offer parametric IFCs and ‘made-to-order’ BIM files to suit the demand of the market as it evolves.

The demand for BIM is there, while the latent potential is enormous. If we get BIM right (and with modest investment from manufacturers, we will), architects and specifiers need never go back to the drawing board again.

George Nelson: A Retrospective

George Nelson Exhibition at Power House Museum, Sydney, 2013

“Design is an integral part of the business.” These are the words of George Nelson, one of the most important American designers of the 20th century. Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum is hosting an exhibition of his works, not only as an architect, but also as a graphic artist, product designer and much more, giving glimpse of his interesting career.

A model of American National Exhibition Pavilion

In some of our past blogs, we have discussed the variety of career paths some architects have chosen. George Nelson seems to be the one who has done almost everything an architect can do at the time. After earning an architectural degree, he worked as an author and journalist.

A model for the American Exhibition 'jungle gym'

In 1947 he opened his own design office when Herman Miller commissioned him to design their collection of furniture. He then ventured into business communications and corporate design of the company. His practice worked in the field of architecture, interiors, graphics, exhibitions and products.

Model of Experimental House

Walking through the exhibits makes one realise the creativity and versatility of Nelson. From miniature models of furniture to dozens of unique clock designs, the display is well curated to experience the complexity of his works.

George Nelson Exhibition at Power House Museum, Sydney, 2013

So if you are in Sydney anytime until 10 Jan 2014, do visit the exhibition.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

New York film school says ‘action’ in new Battery Park facility

Guest Contributor – Karin Kloosterman

I live in a historical building that also serves as a music and performance hall. World music musicians, dancers, whirling dervishes, gurus from India and Kabala centers, spiritual seekers, TED talkers – you name it – have found ‘divine’ inspiration at my home in the heart of Jaffa.

There is no doubt that old buildings have personality with their nooks and crannies to explore. Ghosts to meet. Ceiling heights, room dimensions, tiles, and fixtures are from another time and they affect how we create. Once in a while the cracks and crumbling walls get to me though. No matter how much my husband patches them up, they blow open again. Sometimes I dream of moving into a condo that’s small, fresh and clean; compact and super functional. A place with a clean slate.

Turns out that the New York Film Academy is going to get the best of both worlds - a clean slate and that old historical inspiration as it upsizes its old facilities in Soho to a massive campus at Battery Park.

The new Battery Place facility just being polished off will replace the school’s NYC location, 568 Broadway in SoHo at the corner of Prince and Broadway, which was also a contemporary facility. The film school’s Union Square offices at 100 17th Street in the historic Tammany Hall will stay as the school’s main headquarters and will remain home to a number of the New York Film Academy programs.

But the new facilities are meant to inspire. With impressive views from almost every window, young film makers from far and wide who have dreamed of making it in New York will be dreaming, dancing, editing and saying ‘action’ at the new facilities.

David Klein the senior director at the New York Film Academy tells WAN METROBLOGS: “As filmmakers we recognize that our surroundings do and will impact the art we make. While our older historic facilities in Tammany Hall at Union School – which we will keep – add that certain character which helps us learn, create and grow as artists, the new facilities gives our school that contemporary edge too.

“Meanwhile our space at Tammany Hall has wonderful character and will continue to provide New York Film Academy students will a buzzing, exciting environment to learn, create, and grow as artists.”

What to expect? “Our new location at Battery Place is an improvement over the SoHo space, as it is five times the size. We will have four new shooting studios, four new dance and movement studios, larger classrooms, two screening rooms, several computer editing labs, wonderful administrative space and large new equipment room to house all of our state-of-the-art filmmaking gear.”

Rooms with a view? Klein adds: “The views of New York Harbor and the Statue of Liberty from almost every classroom at the new space are glorious. While there, you cannot help but feel like you are in the heart of one of the most inspiring cities in the world.”

Photos of new Battery Park facility courtesy of the New York Film Academy.

Karin Kloosterman is the founder of an environment news website Green Prophet.

Archikidz! hits Sydney in October

“Building great environments is all about learning to see the potentials of the world around us. Archikidz! is all about beginning to realise these potentials by inspiring kids to see the world as positive and full of possibilities.” These lines of Anthony Burke, Head of School Architecture, UTS (University of Technology, Sydney) capture the real essence of Archikidz!.

A decade ago, Archikidz! was initiated in Netherlands as an annual architectural workshop for children. The event is now held in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Bergen, Barcelona, Buenos Aries and, since last year, in Sydney. This year on Saturday 5 October, around 300 children between age 7-12 will gather at Carriageworks and will be introduced to the world of built environment. Working by side of architect volunteers, the kids will build their models, small and big, around the theme – Building Bridges.

The event is a community initiative of Arque, with the City of Sydney and the Australian Institute of Architects as major partners and is entirely run by volunteers and supporters. From our past experience of being part of the organising team, we know that a lot goes behind making this event. Seeing those amazing large and small scale models made on site by kids, giving a sense of achievement, is a moment all volunteers, sponsors and supporters cherish forever. If you are passionate about architecture and would like to get involved, visit the Archikidz! website to find out more.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

3 x 3 x 3 Design Challenge

As part of Sydney Design 2013, Powerhouse Museum in Sydney hosted the 3 x 3 x 3 Design Challenge where three teams of designers solved pressing problems in Sydney society – 1. Health, 2. Safety and 3. Community. Their solutions are being displayed in a 3 x 3 x 3 meter cube at the museum until 1st September 2013.

Health: Housing – By Paul Pholeros and Heleana Genaus and UNSW students

The housing element highlights the connection between health problems and parts of the living environment. Both in written charts and pictorial artworks, the display aims to spread the message of healthy living conditions and various precautions for some of the most common health issues.

Safety: Emergency shelter – By Jun Sakaguchi and Jeremy Bishop

This safety shelter was originally designed for the Emergency shelter exhibition in 2013. Made from materials that can easily be found after a brushfire disaster, the elements are designed with care to give comfort and lessen the trauma of disaster.

Community: Transportable work-shed – By Tasman Munro

The pop-up workshop cart ‘Wildebeest Workshop’ can be used for variety of community-based building projects, as a shed or for education programs. Made from recycled materials, the cart is small enough for transport and large enough to contain all the equipments needed for the workshops. This smart design can create and nurture various possibilities within a community in a very sustainable and economical way.

It is interesting to see how each team has responded differently to their chosen issue. One by building actual shelter, the other by creating the display to increase awareness and the third by designing mobile solution. Yet, they were spot-on in utilising the 3 x 3 x 3 space to display the solution for the chosen problem.

Photographs by Vin Rathod, text by Priyanka Rathod

Vin Rathod is an architect and a photographer. He holds a Bachelor of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai and Master of Construction Project Management from UNSW, Sydney. Vin is an Emerging Member of Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and works in Sydney, Australia. For Vin, each photograph is a design; a design for the subject, be it an art, architecture, city, or a sculpture. He thrives on creativity and imagination and is always developing new ideas. The photographs speak of his vision to see built-form as an artwork. A collection of Vin’s fine art photographs are constantly evolving as seen on his website Through Vin’s Lens.

As an architect, Priyanka is very much interested in exploring designs with sustainable initiatives. After completing Bachelors of Architecture from KRVIA, Mumbai University, she did her Master of Architecture with major in Design from UNSW, Sydney. In her professional career, Priyanka has worked on variety of projects – urban and rural; commercial, institutional and healthcare both in India and Australia. Her volunteering initiatives include participation in the event organising team of Archikidz! Sydney 2012 held during Sydney Architecture Festival. Currently, Priyanka lives and works in Sydney enjoying her time between professional work and some personal initiatives including writing for Through Vin’s Lens.

1914 Wonderground Map goes on display in London

MacDonald ‘Max’ Gill, the slightly less well-known brother of sculptor and typographer Eric, is to be celebrated in a colourful showcase of artworks more than 60 years after his death. Born in 1884, Gill was an eminent designer, illustrator and architect, although he was later rather overshadowed by his successful brother.

Out of the Shadows: MacDonald Gill (20 September – 2 November) is a free retrospective at the PM Gallery in Ealing, London, an extension to the Sir John Soane-designed Pitzhanger Manor. The exhibition will put a number of rarely-viewed original artworks on display to the general public, giving a prime opportunity to explore the streets of London some 100 years ago.

A selection of the artworks included in the exhibition were uncovered by the nephew of Gill’s second wife when he inherited their family home in the 1980s. Rolled up in chests under the eaves of Gill’s Sussex cottage were a plethora of vivid poster maps of London in excellent condition which were carefully documented by Gill’s great-niece and biographer Caroline Walker.

One of Gill’s much-loved works is the Wonderground Map, a detailed account of London’s underground train stations completed in 1914. The beautifully-finished map remains in fantastic condition and will be one of the key pieces in Out of the Shadows: MacDonald Gill. The images below are close-up shots of the Wonderground Map and will be coupled with numerous other acclaimed works and Gill’s personal effects.

North West

North East

South East

South West

Also included in the exhibition are:

Highways of Empire (1927) – a traffic-stopper across the major cities of the Empire, this map launched the Empire Marketing Board’s publicity campaign

GPO Mail Steamship Routes (1937) – part of a set of three communications maps, this shows the transatlantic journey of mail from pillar box to quayside

Tea Revives the World (1940) – a global view of the history and beneficial effects of Britain’s national drink

Atlantic Charter (1942) – celebrating the Anglo-American treaty which led to the peacetime UN and the cementing of the ‘special relationship’, this poster features the signatures of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill, pasted in to the original artwork

Out of the Shadows: MacDonald Gill
Dates: 20 September – 2 November 2013
Admission is free to all visitors.
PM Gallery & Pitzhanger Manor, Walpole Park, Mattock Lane, Ealing, London W5 5EQ
Opening Times: Tues-Fri 1-5pm; Sat 11am-5pm; Sundays 1-5pm.
Further visitor information: www.ealing.gov.uk/pmgalleryandhouse